Archive for the ‘FasCat’ Category

2013 Indoor Cycling Program

Friday, January 4th, 2013

We have been busy at work finalizing all the details for our Indoor Cycling Program that starts January 8th.  This is our third year running power based indoor cycling classes over the winter.  New for 2013 is that we are
equipping every rider with a PowerTap G3 powermeter and a Joule GPS handlebar mounted computer.  Additionally we are going to upload your data into TrainingPeaks post workout for you to see your wattages and all the power based metrics.   The first 125 riders that sign up receive a FREE 45 Day Premium TrainingPeaks account that already has a 9 week training plan we’ve designed for you to follow the other 6 days of the week you are not in here!

You may be wondering what the 1 hour classes are  like or what you can expect so here is an advanced preview of the 9 week curriculum:

9 week indoor cycling program 2013 from FasCats

 

1. 20 minute Power Based Field Test - determine your threshold, set your zones and establish a baseline for comparison in week 9

Full Gas (as hard as you can) for 20 minutes.  We’ll take your average power output & heart for your wattage & heart rate zones.

2.Tempo Intervals

3 x 10 min ON 5 min OFF @ your TEMPO wattages; Advanced Aerobic Endurance at it’s finest.  Packing more punch into your limited training time

4. Sweet Spot Intervals

3 x 9 min ON 4.5 min OFF @ your Sweet Spot Wattages; More Advanced Aerobic Endurance.  The quintessential “More Bang for your Buck” way to spend an hour on the trainer.

5. Tempo Bursts

3 x 8 min ON 4 min OFF @ your TEMPO Wattages with a “burst” every 2 minutes.  Racing requires ever changing power outputs & surges therefore your workouts should too.

6. The SufferFest!

IWBMYATKYT – “I will beat my ass today to kick yours tomorrow” – super fun and hard interval training set to Pro Tour racing coverage.

7. Criss Cross Intervals

4 x 7 min ON 3.5 min OFF @ TEMPO then FTP wattages for 1 minute in the middle and the end of the 7 minute interval.  Spring is getting closer and your training is getting harder.

8. Threshold Intervals

2 x 10 min ON 5 min OFF, Full Gas – using power to train smack dab in your zone 4, not too hard nor too easy, but just right a la “Goldilocks” . Threshold training is a staple for climbing and time trialing and intervals like these will improve both

9. 20 minute Power Based Field Test to measure your improvement

Same test as week 1 – except this time you are fitter & faster. Perhaps wiser too.  We’ll see what your average power says.

By the end of the 9 weeks, daylight savings will be over and we’ll encourage you to ride outdoors.  Good luck and visit our calendar to find a day & time that’s right for you.

Professional Cyclist Amanda Miller’s Maximal Lactate Steady State Testing

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Functional Threshold testing is the gold standard among power-based testing methodologies. Unlike VO2 max, an athlete’s FTP is high trainable and extremely useful with an athlete’s powermeter.

At the beginning of one’s training in the late fall/early winter, it is a good idea to establish training zones for the early part of the season to make sure you’re training in the proper zones. Furthermore, using MLSS testing can show the improvements made from training during a given time period. Women’s pro cyclist Amanda Miller (Team Tibco) recently came to FasCat in order to set her zones for the next few months as she works to increase her base fitness for the domestic and international road season ahead.
Amanda first came to us in March 2012 before she left for a successful European campaign that would gift her four days in the Maillot Jaune at the La Route De France. The data below represents data from March.

Her Maximal Lactate Steady State (60 min Power) In March 2012 was found to be at 215 watt at 2.85 mMol of lactate. From this data, we can assess that she was in very good aerobic shape, where it took a while to get to her maximal lactate steady state. On November 6th, 2012 after a post-season break and having success racing on the cyclocross circuit and current cyclocross fitness/form, Amanda’s MLSS occurred at 218 watts and 5.55 mMol of lactate.

Producing nearly the same power at MLSS as in March, Amanda is in great shape, but able to produce power at a greater level of blood lactate accumulation. In other words she is able to handle the anaerobic demands of cyclocross where she makes and clears high levels of lactate. Road cycling is much more of an aerobic sport and doesn’t require the quick repetitive anaerobic efforts thus the lower lactates at MLSS (2.85 mMol).

Conclusions that can be drawn from Amanda’s test:
1. Amanda is in cyclocross shape as indicated by an MLSS at 5.55mMol compared to the same power output at 2.85mMol with road race (aerobic) training.
2. Amanda’s FTP is 218watts, which is 3 watts higher than her FTP this past March.
3. This test reveals a nice piece of supporting evidence that road cyclists can benefit from racing cyclocross.

Thanks to Amanda for coming to the FasCat Exercise Physiology Lab!

Testimonial
“The staff at FasCat are very friendly and professional. They make a lactic threshold test easy and bearable, and when analyzing the results, are very knowledgeable and helpful to help understand the numbers. I can use this updated information in my training for 2013 to have my best season yet. Thanks to Frank, Carson and the rest of the FasCat staff” ~Amanda Miller Pro Cyclist for Team Tibco

Colorado University Cycling Team Training Camp & VO2 Max Testing

Monday, February 6th, 2012

by Carson Christen, FasCat Exercise Physiologist & Coach

Recently, FasCat Coaching in conjunction with the University of Colorado Boulder Men and Women’s cycling team held a training camp for US Collegiate Cycling National Championship hopefuls in Boulder, Colorado.  The three day camp involved physiological testing, organizational meetings & a group ride at the FasCat Performance Center.

Measuring Performance Potential

Athletes completed VO2 max tests to determine their physiological potential.   An athlete with high VO2 max values is said to be “gifted” and could be very successful.  VO2 max is written in terms of relative (ml/kg/min) or absolute (L/min).  Relative is related to a subjects body weight, while absolute is the total volume of oxygen that can be inspired regardless of body weight.  Athletes with high VO2 max values that have gone on to greatness are Greg Lemond (92.5ml/kg/min) and Miguel Indurain (88.0ml/kg/min).   For reference, the CU male athletes tested between 54 – 84ml/kg/min and CU female athletes tested between 48-65ml/kg/min.  The CU athletes have tremendous potential but that does not guarantee success.  Beyond one’s physiology elite level results takes several years of hard training and racing seasons (aka experience).

According to Science: VO2 values for Elite Cyclists

Professional male and female cyclists possess greater VO2 max values than recreational and amateur level athletes.  Data from Wilber, Zawadzki, Kearney, Shannon, and Disalvo (1997) found that elite male American cyclists possess VO2 max’s of 70 – 75 ml/kg/min (5 – 5.25 L/min) with many professionals exceeding 80.0 ml/kg/min (5.45L/min).  Martin, McLean, Trewin, Lee, Victor, and Hahn (2001) found that elite female cyclists produced VO2 max values of 60 – 70 ml/kg/min (3.66 – 4.10 L/min).  Research conducted by Jeukendrup, Craig, and Hawley (2000) analyzed professional cyclists and determined that most current professional cyclists have absolute VO2 max values greater then 5.5L/min for males and 4.0L/min for females.

So you want to turn PRO?

What does this mean for us as average Joe cyclists? In order to make a domestic pro team in the United States, it is safe to say that a male should have a VO2 max of roughly 68.0-75.0ml/kg/min.  Anything greater than 75.0ml/kg/min, with proper training, you may be receiving calls from European Directeur Sportifs!  To quote Allen Lim (Ph.D), “VO2 directly correlates to your cycling paycheck”.  Female cyclists should produce values greater then 56ml/kg/min in order to increase chances of competing at the pro level.  Most athletes not above this elite level will fall into one of the amateur categories of cycling.  For amateur male athletes in the 20-30 age range, anything above 48-62ml/kg/min is considered “good” and they can be quite competitive in amateur racing categories.  Female cyclists are generally in the 42-51ml/kg/min range.

Table 1. Criteria for VO2 Max Classification

Category Male Female
Pro Tour & World Class 75-90 ml/kg/min >60 ml/kg/min
Domestic  Pro 68-80 ml/kg/min 50-60 ml/kg/min
Cat 2 58-73 ml/kg/min 45-50 ml/kg/min
Cat 3/4 50-63 ml/kg/min 40-45 ml/kg/min
Cat 5 <50 ml/kg/min <40 ml/kg/min

** It should be noted that these are estimates based on research, and are not definitive criteria for racing categories**

Having a genetically high VO2 max is not the end all.   There is no substitute for hard work and proper training.   Elite level athletes need to have high VO2‘s but they also need to train incredibly hard.

On the contrary there are many successful amateur & professional athletes that have ordinary VO2′s.  In these cases they make up for their ‘average’ VO2‘s by their ability to exercise at 88-90% of their VO2 max for extended periods of time.   These are the athletes who can ‘suffer’ and scrap their way to good performances.  It never comes easy but these athletes possess additional ways to get the most of out their bodies.

Respiratory Exchange Ratios (RER): Additional Insight

The Respiratory Exchange Ratio (RER) is a value which determines how much oxygen is being consumed by the body compared to the amount of carbon dioxide expired. A value of 1.00 represents an even shift of gases exchanged by the body.  A value greater than 1.00 suggests that an athlete is not receiving enough oxygen to fuel their muscles, usually around Lactic Threshold.  A value of 1.05 has generally been used as one confirmation point that the athlete has reached VO2 max. Now, every athlete is different, but it is beneficial as a coach to understand these values. If an athlete barely or cannot even reach 1.0RER before exhaustion, this suggests that they have a very good aerobic engine, being very efficient at burning fat as their primary fuel.  An athlete however, that reaches 1.0RER very quickly and continues to rise above 1.05 before exhaustion suggests that the athlete burns primarily carbohydrate as fuel, and could improve their performance by burning more fat in preference to muscle glycogen (carbohydrate).   This is often referred to as being more efficient  and can be addressed in training.

Summary

With the proper data from the VO2 tests we conducted during CU’s training camp, we, as coaches, are able to understand the athletes’ strengths and weaknesses.  Furthermore we are able to see areas for opportunity and  recommend certain types of training to address weaknesses or deficiencies.  All in all the training camp was a great way to learn about the CU riders’s personality & physiology.  Now the hard work begins in preparation of the 2012 collegiate season and national championships!

References

Jeukendrup, A. E., Craig, N. P., & Hawley, J. A. (2000). The bioenergetics of world class cycling. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 3(4), 414-433.

Martin, D. T., Mclean, B., Trewin, C., Hamilton, L., Victor, J., & Han, A. G. (2001). Physiological characteristics of nationally competitive female road cyclists and demands of competition. Sports Medicine, 31(7), 469-477.

Wilber, R., Zawadzki, L., Katherine, M., Kearney, J. T., Shannon, M. P., & Disalvo, D. (1997). Physiological profiles of elite off-road and road cyclists. Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise, 29(8), 1090-1094.

2012 Indoor Cycling Program

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

We have been busy at work finalizing all the details for our Indoor Cycling Program that starts January 3rd.  

You may be wondering what the 1 hour classes are  like or what you can expect so here is an advanced preview of the 12 week curriculum:

1. Intro to Training with Power

The purpose of this session is to teach you how to train with power (& heart rate), orient you to our equipment & the class.

2. 20 minute Power Based Field Test

Full Gas (as hard as you can) for 20 minutes.  We’ll take your average power output & heart for your wattage & heart rate zones.  Plus you’ll also set a benchmark for how fast you are.

3.Tempo Intervals

3 x 10 min ON 5 min OFF @ your TEMPO wattages; Advanced Aerobic Endurance at it’s finest.  Packing more punch into your limited training time

4. Sweet Spot Intervals

3 x 9 min ON 4.5 min OFF @ your Sweet Spot Wattages; More Advanced Aerobic Endurance.  The quintessential “More Bang for your Buck” way to spend an hour on the trainer.

5. Tempo Bursts

3 x 8 min ON 4 min OFF @ your TEMPO Wattages with a “burst” every 2 minutes.  Racing requires ever changing power outputs & surges therefore your workouts should too.

6. The SufferFest!

IWBMYATKYT – “I will beat my ass today to kick yours tomorrow” – super fun and hard interval training set to Pro Tour racing coverage.

7. Criss Cross Intervals

4 x 7 min ON 3.5 min OFF @ TEMPO then FTP wattages for 1 minute in the middle and the end of the 7 minute interval.  Spring is getting closer and your training is getting harder.

8. Over Unders

4 x 5 min ON 5 min OFF, Zone 6 to start (30 seconds), Sweet Spot in the middle (4 minutes) and finishing with a zone 6 effort (30 seconds).   Over unders are a great dynamic power based workout that mimics what happens at the bottom of a climb and then again at the top.  “Surgy”

9. Threshold Intervals

2 x 12 min ON 6 min OFF, Full Gas – using power to train smack dab in your zone 4, not too hard nor

too easy, but just right a la “Goldilocks” . Threshold training is a staple for climbing and time trialing and

intervals like these will improve both

10. VO2 Max Intervals

2 sets of 2 x 3 min ON 3 min OFF, FULL GAS, with a 5 minute set break @ Zone 5 wattages.  “According to Science” VO2 intervals raise your threshold power.  We’ll show you how to use your power output to push yourself hard enough to reap the benefit of VO2Max Intervals.

11. Anaerobic Zone 6 Intervals

2 sets of 3 x 1 min ON 1 min OFF, FULL GAS, with a 5 minute set break @ Zone 6 wattages.  Sometimes bike races are hard and this is why.  Cry in the DoJo so you can laugh on the Battlefield.

12. 20 minute Power Based Field Test to measure your improvement

Same test as week 2 – except this time you are fitter & faster. Perhaps wiser too.  We’ll see what your average power says.

By the end of the 12 weeks, daylight savings will be over and we’ll encourage you to ride outdoors.  Good luck and visit our calendar to find a day & time that’s right for you.  

Which PowerMeter is Right for You?

Monday, December 19th, 2011

Buying a powermeter is not always a straightforward decision .  Cost is probably the biggest consideration.  Compatibility with your equipment is usually next.  This leads into how you are going to use your powermeter and whether or not you want to capture race data (which is the best) or not.   For example if you buy a powertap wheel and swap it between your road and time trial bike, what happens when you want to run a disk wheel?  Conversely is your road and TT bike compatible with the same crank based powermeter you are considering?  (I.e.  does your road & TT Bike have the same type of bottom bracket that will allow you to swap your crank based powermeter from bike to bike?)

These considerations & others all go into the purchasing process.  At FasCat we are coaches & athletes that run into these same considerations for the athletes we coach, so we know how to consult with you about which powermeter is right for you.   Its a worthwhile discussion to have.  In the meantime, he’s a comparison chart that covers many of the considerations to weigh when determining which powermeter is right for you.

Quarq, SRM & PowerTap Comparison Table

Notice that we have included the Garmin Vector.  The Vector is going to be one of the hottest powermeters for 2012.  At a $1500 price tag, many are going to be early adopters of this first to market pedal-based powermeter.  We are holding our breath and eagerly awaiting our chance to ride and evaluate it’s accuracy, data, and reliability.  Until then, the question marks above will stay.   It will be extremely easy to put these pedals on an SRM or CinQo & overlay the data to compare.

As always, we are available to discuss which powermeter is right for you.  And of course we’ll extend our free month coaching to anyone that buys from FasCat.  During that free month we’ll include the follow (among others)

1. Wattage Based Field Test to determine your power at threshold and training zones in watts
2. Power Based Training Calendar
3. Expert Analysis of your power data and daily Coaching Feedback
4. We will teach you how to use you powermeter
5. FasCat will provide technical software and powermeter support for the life of your powermeter

Quarq Quatro Mountain Bike Powermeter

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

by Jason Hilimire

I was lucky enough to receive a pre-production Quarq mountain bike powermeter the other week & thought I’d share it’s awesome-ness with you here.   We are told the Quatro will be available December 9th and you can buy them from FasCat here.  The Quatro will cost the same as the road CinQo, $1795 for the GXP & $1,845 for the BB30 version.  Unlike the road versions, the Quatro’s spider will not be sold separately.

I’ve been looking forward  to the Quarq mountain bike power meter since we heard rumors about it a year ago.  It’s lightweight, low cost and Quarq’s accurate to +/- 2% with a user replaceable battery.

Upon installation to my Superfly 100, I was immediately impressed.  It’s a SRAM XO level carbon fiber crankset with the high quality Quarq spider.  Claimed weight is 814 grams for the quatro while a standard GXP XO is 788 grams, so a 26 gram weight penalty to pay for adding the power meter.  I’ve been using a few different power meters on the dirt over the past 5 seasons and I can definitely tell you it’s extremely nice to not have to incur the typical weight penalty that comes with using one.

According to Quarq they test each unit for 20 minutes under water to ensure they are up to the rigorous demands of mountain bike racing (aka mud, water & rain).  The battery is user replaceable and with the Qalvin iPhone app and a Wahoo Fitness dongle, any person with a known weight can easily calibrate there quatro.  This will be particularly useful as I often have to change chainrings a few times throughout the season.

A few different options for gearing are available, but only in 2 x 10 configurations: 39/26 or the more stout 42/28.  Riders can also choose a GXP (shown) or a slightly lighter BB30 in your favorite crank length (170-175mm).  I chose the 39/26 as it’s what I’m currently running and a little more useful for those all day climbs out here in Colorado.

Installation was super easy and very quick.  It came with a plethora of magnets for the cadence sensor and only takes a few moments to decide which one is most useful.  On the superfly 100, there is a bottom bracket protector and I simply stuck it there, but your mileage may vary.  I fiired up my Garmin 800 unit and within seconds & a few spins of the cranks and it was paired up and ready to go.  With the Quarq’s it’s recommended to spin the cranks 5x backwards and go thru Garmin’s synchronization set prior to riding.  But if ever unsure, again that’s a great aspect of the Qalvin app.

I was able to get out for a thorough test on the unit this past weekend at Hall Ranch in Lyons, CO.  Hall Ranch has great terrain to ride and I have some power data off these same trails, so would be easy to compare any data.  Coming from an XO crank, I noticed no difference in stiffness at all.  Basically the same chainrings I’ve ran all season, so shifting was super crisp as usual.  It may be the newer rings, but I never threw my chain over the rings which is often an issue with 2 x 10 systems (and a problem I’ve had most season).  The Quatro itself looks quite burley and the metal battery cap will easily stand up to a thrown chain.

The unit worked flawlessly on the trails for the few rides I’ve done.  Never had any data drop-outs, etc and it worked pretty much as expected. I’ve been on power long enough that I’m aware of the numbers I should be hitting, where and when and they seems to reflect what I felt.  The new software on the Garmin 800/500 adds some key power metrics that will truly make it useful for hitting up the trails, XC and long courses this season.

Power on the mountain bike is slowly starting to become all the rage. Though I’ve been ahead of the curve for a few seasons and  I’ve written a handful of articles on Mountain Bike Power. The articles explain the unique demands and provide some example workouts to meet those demands:

So there you have it, a new power meter for the dirt and a full set of recommended workouts to make you fast for the upcoming season. Remember it’s not an actual power meter that will make you faster, but rather the knowledge to understand the information that a power meter provides and how to apply that information to you and your training.  Thankfully, we provide 1 month of FREE coaching with every power meter purchase.  What are you waiting for, grab your Quatro today and hit the trails!
–Jason Hilimire

CU Mountain Bike Team Places 2nd at Collegiate Nationals

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

by Jason Hilimire, CU Mountain Bike Coach

Finally wrapping things up after an awesome performance but the University of Colorado-Boulder’s 2nd place finish at Collegiate Mountain Bike National Championships in Angel Fire, NM.  The team was dialed, the support staff was awesome and our riders performed.  We narrowly missed taking the National championships by 8 points overall!!  (results here) We are primed and ready to take down the Ft. Lewis juggernaut next season.

We rolled out to Angel Fire under an impressive snow-storm that would reach the small ski resort.  With up to 8 inches of snow hitting the mountain it would make for a difficult weekend for the riders dealing with the cold and mud.  Our riders handled the cards they were dealt with and we had them dialed and ready to race.

Each morning the support crew and myself set up the trainers and a propane heater for the ladies who went off in the early morning and for the men who would go in the afternoon (& thus deal with thawing mud). Getting a proper warmup in the cold and muddy conditions was key to the teams success.

Both days 6 women and 4 men in the endurance races killed it.  In the XC races, Deidre York took 4th and Claire Bensard 5th, Katie Sodergren 7th, Ashlee Wilson 10th, Abigail Mickey 11th and Ellie Atkins placed 20th.  On the men’s side 3 riders cracked the top 10 behind the fastest rider in the US Howard Grotts, Sam Morrison was 8th, Peter O’Donnel 9th, Brad Berger 10th and Kevin Kane 17th.

They lined up again for short track and again gave it everything and pulled off some impressive performances.  Claire Bensard cracked the podium with a 4th place finish, while Sodegren was 6th, York 7th, Mickey 8th, Wilson 17th and Atkins 32.  On the men’s side Sam Morrison cracked the podium in 4th, O’Donnel was 10th, Kane 16th, Berger 39th.

And as impressive as the Endurance racers were, the gravity gang took home 2 National Championship Jerseys!!  The Downhill track on saturday was an icy chute at the top, challenging every riders skill levels and some even using the ‘butt-scoot’ to go downhill!!  Joey Schusler took his 4th National Championship and Michael Larsen moved up on his previous finishes with a 3rd, Nick Caron was 12th and Andrew Dean was 31st.

Sunday’s Dual Slalom turned into an 8 hour endurance race, but in the end Joey Schusler would take home his 2nd National Championship Jersey with a dominating performance.  He seemed to get faster and faster each time he descend the slick as snot dual course.  Caron would finish 6th, Larsen 19th and Dean 36th.  On the Women’s side York took home yet another podium with 5th and Bensard was 8th.

In the Omnium; York would finish 2nd and Bensard 3rd.

Overall, the team fought their hardest and gave everything every race.  I couldn’t have asked for more from the riders and I am super proud of every single one of them.  We had a blast for certain and while we didn’t finish #1 overall, we were certainly #1 in fun and #westolethemarmot !!

Next year we’ll be back with a vengeance and we are ready!

Jason Hilimire CU Mtb Coach

CU Buffs National Team Roster & Training Camp

Friday, October 21st, 2011

The Colorado University Mountain Bike Team has begun their final preparation for Collegiate Nationals next weekend in Angel Fire, NM.  Here is the 14 rider team roster:

Endurance Men:                                                                                                                                                                            
-Peter O’Donnell
-Brad Berger
-Samuel Morrison                                             
-Kevin Kane
Endurance Female:
-Katie Sodergren
-Abigail Mickey
-Ashlee Wilson
-Ellie Atkins
-Deidre York (competing in all 4 events!)
-Claire Bensard (competing in all 4 events!)
Gravity Men:
-Joey Schusler (3 time Collegiate Nat’l Champ!)
-Michael Larsen
-Andrew Dean
-Nick Caron

Starting Thursday the team began a 4 day Nationals Training Camp consisting of threshold work specific to the length of climbing they’ll compete up at Angel Fire.   We’ve raced this course before and know firsthand how important one’s power to weight ratio is!

Here is the training Coach Jason Hilimire will be leading the team on:

Good luck to the team & GO BUFFS !!!!


In Depth Description of the FasCat Off Season Training Program

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

by Frank Overton  

We described our off season training program here and we wanted to share a more in depth video description as well:

The Goal: Increase Functional Threshold Power and Race Specific Power Output
The goal of our off season training program is to increase the athlete’s power at threshold and race specific power outputs.  Our off season training program is divided into 5 phases that as a whole are much greater than the sum of the parts.  To measure improvement we test at the beginning of the off season and right before the first race with expectations of a 3-20% increase in power at threshold.  The 5 phases are as follows:

1. Annual Training Program (ATP) Development

2. Fall Foundation, Aerobic Endurance

3. Resistance Training: 10 Week, 4 Phase Cycling Specific

4. Advanced Aerobic Endurance ”Base” - build a “Hemi-Powered Aerobic Engine”

5. Pre-Season Interval Work to Increase Race Specific Power Output

For more information about the FasCat Off Season Program, please watch the video, read more here  or get in touch with us to receive a new athlete questionnaire and talk with a coach about your goals, challenges, dreams and A races.                      

New Cyclocross Coaching Program

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

For the 2011 cyclocross season we have put together a highly specialized cyclocross specific coaching program for athletes interested in improving their skills and racing.   The plan runs thru December or will go into January if the athlete attends the US National Championships.   We’ve put together the coaching features we consider crucial to cyclocross performance and bundled them up here:

• FREE initial coaching consultation, review of previous cx training & goal setting

• Initial Cyclocross Skills Assessment to identify your strengths and weaknesses

• Development of a strategic race program to help you acheive your goals

• Specific Cyclocross Training Program delivered regularly in a monthly calendar format with customized recovery, interval workouts, skills practices & pre-race preparation

• Twice Monthly Cyclocross Skills Practices led by a FasCat Coach (local only)

• Easily communicate with your coach by email, phone, or in person at FasCat for questions, training program adjustments, to review your races and talk about your upcoming races, etc…

If you are interested we highly encourage you to get in touch with us to ask any and all questions.  Email us for a new athlete questionnaire; the coaching consultation is free.

Start up fee: $75 – waived                                              

$450 = Total Cost: $150/4 weeks x 14 weeks – 2 weeks FREE